How cruel were the Dutch in Indonesia?

How did the Dutch affect Indonesia?

Starting in the 1830s, the Dutch instituted a sugar-growing system in some areas, building 94 sugar-processing factories, as well as roads and railroads to transport materials and products. Generally the Dutch would export high-quality sugar from Indonesia while keeping lower-quality sugar in the country.

How was Dutch rule in Indonesia?

From 1910, the Dutch created the most centralised state power in Southeast Asia. Politically, the highly centralised power structure, including the exorbitant powers of exile and censorship, established by the Dutch administration was carried over into the new Indonesian republic.

Did the Dutch commit genocide?

The Rawagede massacre (Dutch: Bloedbad van Rawagede, Indonesian: Pembantaian Rawagede), was committed by the Royal Netherlands East Indies Army on 9 December 1947 in the village of Rawagede (now Balongsari in West Java).

Rawagede massacre
Date December 9, 1947 (UTC+7)
Target Villagers
Attack type Massacre
Deaths 431

Why did the Dutch want Indonesia?

The Dutch arrived in Indonesia in 1595 looking for natural resources and a place to take over.

Why does Indonesia not speak Dutch?

Why are Indonesians making such a hodgepodge of their language? They were able to shake off Dutch colonialism thanks to their nationalism, but they have never had to fight for their language. The Netherlands did not impose Dutch in its colonies, so there was never any question of language nationalism there.

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Is slavery legal in Indonesia?

In terms absolute numbers, Indonesia was ranked ninetieth on the 2016 Global Slavery Index. … Today, under international law, slavery is illegal. In practice, however, these laws are not well enforced, permitting the continuation of some forms of slavery.

How did the Dutch treat the natives?

Regarding the Indians, the Dutch generally followed a policy of live and let live: they did not force assimilation or religious conversion on the Indians. Both in Europe and in North America, the Dutch had little interest in forcing conformity on religious, political, and racial minorities.