Quick Answer: When was the Ho Chi Minh Trail used?

Did the US use the Ho Chi Minh Trail?

About the same time—but less openly—the US began use of sustained air strikes on the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Steel Tiger was the name applied to both the operation and to the geographic area, which was the Laotian panhandle south of Mu Gia Pass.

What is significant about the Ho Chi Minh Trail?

The Ho Chi Minh Trail consisted of a network of roads that were built from North Vietnam to South Vietnam and passed through neighbouring countries Cambodia and Laos. The roads were very important because they provided logistical support to the North Vietnamese army and the Vietcong during the war.

Where did the Ho Chi Minh Trail began and end?

The Ho Chi Minh Trail was a military supply route running from North Vietnam through Laos and Cambodia to South Vietnam.

How many died on the Ho Chi Minh Trail?

Tri said 29 people died on the spot, while two others died on the way to the hospital. The veterans had left Hanoi on Monday as part of a tour to visit old battlefields, intending to arrive in the former South Vietnam capital of Saigon to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the end of the war on April 30.

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How was the Ho Chi Minh Trail used?

The Ho Chi Minh Trail was used by the North Vietnamese as a route for its troops to get into the South. They also used the trail as a supply route – for weapons, food and equipment. The Ho Chin Minh Trail ran along the Laos/Cambodia and Vietnam borders and was dominated by jungles.

Why did Cambodia allow the Ho Chi Minh Trail?

The Ho Chi Minh Trail was a network of roads built from North Vietnam to South Vietnam through the neighboring countries of Laos and Cambodia, to provide logistical support to the Vietcong and the North Vietnamese Army during the Vietnam War.

How did Ho Chi Minh and the Vietnam response?

When Japan formally surrendered to the Allies on September 2, 1945, Ho Chi Minh felt emboldened enough to proclaim the independent Democratic Republic of Vietnam. … In response, the Viet Minh launched an attack against the French in Hanoi on December 19, 1946—the beginning of the First Indochina War.