Quick Answer: How does Indonesia get water?

Does Indonesia have enough water?

About 18 million Indonesians lack safe water and 20 million lack access to improved sanitation facilities. Fortunately, there is a growing microfinance sector serving low-income households across the country, and they are recognizing that financing for water supply and sanitation is a growing need.

What of clean water does the Indonesian government provide?

The Indonesian government targets 100 percent of access to safe drinking water for all Indonesian citizens to be achieved in 2019. However, in 2018 the realization only reached 72 percent.

Where does Jakarta get their water?

The most common water source for Jakarta mainly comes from water purification from Citarum River and from other areas outside Jakarta, such as Jatiluhur Dam (Figure 5). The second water source option is groundwater. Unfortunately, groundwater was not very dependable water source for domestic needs.

What causes water pollution in Indonesia?

In addition to domestic activities, sources of water pollution also come from industrial activities wastes water such as small scale industries, agriculture, textile, pulp and paper, petrochemical, mining, and oil and gas.

Does Jakarta have access to clean water?

Even with that imbalance, Jakarta does not experience water scarcity, but getting access to clean water is difficult for a large number of the city’s residents. Currently, only 60 per cent of the people living in the city have access to piped water.

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Is Indonesia better than India?

However, Indonesia scores better than India on fiscal matters. According to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Indonesia’s general government debt is at 29.6% of GDP, while India’s is significantly higher at nearly 69% of GDP in 2018. India also has a much higher general government fiscal deficit.

What is the water quality in Indonesia?

Water quality is poor regardless of socio-economic conditions. A 2017 survey of drinking water in Yogyakarta, a well-off urban centre in Java, found that 89 per cent of water sources and 67 per cent of household drinking water were contaminated by fecal bacteria.