Is Indonesia densely populated?

Does Indonesia have a high population density?

Indonesia population is equivalent to 3.51% of the total world population. Indonesia ranks number 4 in the list of countries (and dependencies) by population. The population density in Indonesia is 151 per Km2 (391 people per mi2).

Why is Indonesia population so high?

According to the 2010 census, roughly 3.6 million people lived in them. In the decade up to 2010, the two provinces experienced the fastest population growth in Indonesia. Over this time the population increased by 64 per cent due to increasing migration and a higher than average birth rate.

Is Indonesia considered a Third World country?

“Third World” lost its political root and came to refer to economically poor and non-industrialized countries, as well as newly industrialized countries.

Third World Countries 2021.

Country Human Development Index 2021 Population
Indonesia 0.694 276,361,783
Vietnam 0.694 98,168,833
Egypt 0.696 104,258,327
Philippines 0.699 111,046,913

Is Jakarta sinking?

Like many coastal cities around the world, Jakarta is dealing with sea-level rise. But Indonesia’s biggest city also has a unique problem: Because of restricted water access in the city, the majority of its residents have to extract groundwater to survive. … Today, Jakarta is the world’s fastest-sinking city.

What city is most densely populated?

Dhaka (Bangladesh) led the ranking of cities with the highest population density in 2021, with 36,941 residents per square kilometer.

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Is Indonesia poorer than India?

With a nominal gross domestic product (GDP) of $2.6 trillion, India is a significantly bigger economy than Indonesia ($1.01 trillion). … Consequently, its nominal per-capita GDP ($1,983 in 2017) is significantly lower than Indonesia’s ($3,876).

How overpopulated is Indonesia?

Country’s population has topped 270M, over 56% living on Java Island, according to 2020 census results. Indonesia’s population increased by 32.56 million over the past decade, the country’s statistics authority has announced.

Why is Indonesia’s birth rate decreasing?

Fertility rates are falling across the world, although the pace is slower in Indonesia. Potent socioeconomic forces such as rapid urbanisation, rising incomes, and improving female education and labour participation are giving rise to smaller families, Asian Development Bank principal economist Donghyun Park said.