You asked: What do you use Vietnamese mint for?

Can you eat Vietnamese mint?

Both peppermint and spearmint are quite common in Vietnamese cuisine. They are added to fresh rolls (gỏi cuốn) as a complimentary flavor to the pork and shrimp.

Is Vietnamese mint the same as Thai basil?

Vietnamese mint smells similar to Thai basil but it is far more pungent with a hot bite and slight numbing character and a strong alkalinity. Also known as hot mint, it is the leaf to use in Malaysian laksa soups, and is often simply known as laksa leaf. It’s also used as a salad ingredient, and cooked dishes.

Can I freeze Vietnamese mint?

You could also freeze the leaves for a rainy day or dry them out. For the former, remove the leaves from the stem and lay on baking trays in the freezer. Once frozen, pack loosely into freezer bags making sure you don’t crush them too much but do expel as much air as you can.

What can I substitute for Vietnamese mint?

I have a soup recipe that calls for Vietnamese mint and I cannot get it anywhere. I have used tarragon as a substitute, but would really like to have the correct ingredients. You can get Vietnamese mint – Persicaria odorata, aka Vietnamese coriander – in Asian supermarkets, should you have one to hand.

How do you care for Vietnamese mint?

Vietnamese mint prefers partial sun, but can grow in full sun where there is plenty of water. The plant should never dry out, and grows well even in standing water — often growing in wet pond or stream margins. Soil should be rich, with plenty of nitrogen to fuel leafy growth.

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Is Vietnamese coriander good for you?

The leaves are used for medicine. People use Vietnamese coriander for diabetes, stomach pain, constipation, dandruff, gas (flatulence), and to reduce sexual desire, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses. In food, Vietnamese coriander is used to flavor soups, stews, and salads.